About the Tara Brooch

In Ireland, many people see the Tara Brooch as the greatest of all Celtic brooches. It dates back to the 7th Century and is viewed as a symbol of ancient Celtic culture in the Emerald Isles.

The name of the Brooch refers to the Hill of Tara, which is a location commonly referred to as the seat of the High Kings of Ireland. However, it’s interesting to know that the Tara Brooch itself does not originate from this place. Instead, it has an altogether different story behind it.

In August 1850, a peasant woman found the original Tara Brooch on a beach in Bettystown, County Meath, Ireland. The Brooch was supposedly in a box, buried in the sand. There are skeptics out there who believe that the brooch was actually found further inland in Ireland, however, the family altered the location it was found in their story in order to prevent the landowner from claiming the Tara Brooch as their own. The peasant woman then sold the Brooch on to a jeweler based in Dublin. This Jewelry specialist – George Waterhouse – had a keen eye for Celtic jewelry and had already started to focus on sales of Celtic Revival jewelry and gave the Tara Brooch its name!

The Brooch experienced profound popularity, both in Ireland and beyond. It was seen as a Hallmarked piece of Celtic Art and Celtic metalwork, making appearances at the Great Exhibition in London in 1851, the Paris Exposition Universelle and the Dublin Exhibition. It was even sent for inspection by the Queen at Windsor Castle! Nowadays, the original Tara Brooch is revered as a piece of Celtic history and is on display in the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin.

How to Wear a Tara Brooch?

You can wear our Celtic Tara Brooches however you like. There’s no specific side you should wear your Brooch on, and they can be worn by ladies and men. They can be worn decoratively on a piece of clothing or can be used to fasten clothing together.

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